Clarification on Server Applications licensed in Per Processor Mode

 

I get quite a number of queries come through asking how to license Server Applications in Per Proc mode, well, there are 2 things to keep in mind

  1. Is it Enterprise Edition
  2. Will I be utilising virtualisation or license movement

After this, its pretty straightforward

Rules for Enterprise editions of per proc server applications

If you buy SQL 2008 EE, or BizTalk 2006 EE or Commerce Server 2007 EE or ISA Server EE you have a choice on how to license

Determining the Number of Licenses Required.

The number of licenses required is based on either the total number of physical processors on the server (as described in option (i) below) or the number of virtual and physical processors used (as described in option (ii) below).

For Enterprise Editions of the software, you may follow either option 1 or 2

Option 1: Unlimited Virtualization. Under this option, the number of software licenses required for a server equals the total number of physical processors on that server. 

Counting and assigning licenses based on this option permits you to run the server software in one physical and any number of virtual operating system environments without regard to the number of physical and virtual processors used. This option is available to you only for enterprise editions of the software.

Option 2: Licensing based on Processors Used. Under this option, the total number of software licenses required for a server equals the sum of the software licenses required under (A) and (B) below.

(A) To run instances of the server software in the physical operating system environment on a server, you need a software license for each physical processor that the physical operating system environment uses.

(B) To run instances of the server software in virtual operating system environments on a server, you need a software license for each virtual processor that each of those virtual operating system environments uses. If a virtual operating system environment uses a fraction of a virtual processor, the fraction counts as a full virtual processor.

After you determine the number of licenses you require, using either method above, you must assign those licenses to your server, that server then becomes the licensed server

After you determine the number of software licenses you need for a server, you must assign that number of software licenses to that server.

That server is the licensed server for all of those licenses. You may not assign the same license to more than one server. A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate server.

You may reassign a software license, but not on a short-term basis (i.e., not within 90 days of the last assignment).

You may reassign a software license sooner if you retire the licensed server due to permanent hardware failure. If you reassign a license, the server to which you reassign the license becomes the new licensed server for that license*** See below for new rules around Server Farm***

Running Instances of the Server Software. Your right to run the software depends on the option used to determine the number of licenses required.

Option 1: Unlimited Virtualization. If you assign to a server licenses equal to the total number of physical processors on the server:

(A) You may run, at any one time, any number of instances of the server software in one physical and any number of virtual operating system environments on that server.

(B) You do not need to license virtual processors.

Option 2: Licensing based on Processors Used. You may run, at any one time, any number of instances of the server software in physical and virtual operating system environments on the licensed server. However, the total number of physical and virtual processors used by those operating system environments cannot exceed the number of software licenses assigned to that server.

 

So what if you have purchased the Standard edition of the per proc product, Rules are slightly different

Determining the number of licenses required

Licensing based on Processors Used. Under this option, the total number of software licenses required for a server equals the sum of the software licenses required under (A) and (B) below.

(C) To run instances of the server software in the physical operating system environment on a server, you need a software license for each physical processor that the physical operating system environment uses.

(D) To run instances of the server software in virtual operating system environments on a server, you need a software license for each virtual processor that each of those virtual operating system environments uses. If a virtual operating system environment uses a fraction of a virtual processor, the fraction counts as a full virtual processor.

After you determine the number of licenses you require, using either method above, you must assign those licenses to your server, that server then becomes the licensed server

After you determine the number of software licenses you need for a server, you must assign that number of software licenses to that server.

That server is the licensed server for all of those licenses. You may not assign the same license to more than one server. A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate server.

You may reassign a software license, but not on a short-term basis (i.e., not within 90 days of the last assignment).

You may reassign a software license sooner if you retire the licensed server due to permanent hardware failure. If you reassign a license, the server to which you reassign the license becomes the new licensed server for that license*** See below for new rules around Server Farm***

Running Instances of the Server Software. Your right to run the software depends on the option used to determine the number of licenses required.

Licensing based on Processors Used. You may run, at any one time, any number of instances of the server software in physical and virtual operating system environments on the licensed server. However, the total number of physical and virtual processors used by those operating system environments cannot exceed the number of software licenses assigned to that server.

 

***Assigning Licenses and Using Software within a Server Farm.

You may determine the number of licenses you need, assign those licenses, and use the server software as provided in the General License Terms.

Alternatively, you may apply the use rights below.

Server farm.

A server farm consists of up to two data centers each physically located:

· in a time zone that is within four hours of the local time zone of the other (Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and not DST), and/or

· within the European Union (EU) and/or European Free Trade Association (EFTA).

Each data center may be part of only one server farm. You may reassign a data center from one server farm to another, but not on a short-term basis (i.e., not within 90 days of the last assignment).

License reassignment.

· License reassignment within a server farm. You may reassign software licenses to any of your servers located within the same server farm as often as needed. The prohibition against short-term reassignment does not apply to licenses assigned to servers located within the same server farm.

· License reassignment across server farms. You may reassign software licenses to any of your servers located in different server farms, but not on a short-term basis (i.e., not within 90 days of the last assignment).

Determining the Number of Licenses Required.

Despite anything to the contrary in General License Terms about how to count virtual and physical processors, you need a number of licenses equal to or greater than the number of physical processors on licensed servers within a server farm at any one time supporting or used by operating system environments in which instances of the software are running.

Running instances of the server software in a server farm.

Because you are permitted to reassign licenses as needed, as long as you meet the following requirement, you may run the software in any number of operating system environments within a server farm. The number of physical processors supporting or used by operating system environments at any one time may not exceed the number of licenses assigned to servers within the farm.

Alternative method of counting. Instead of counting the number of physical processors supporting virtual operating system environments, you may count the number of virtual processors being used by virtual operating system environments in which instances are running. For purposes of this method of counting, disregard the statement in the Universal License Terms that a virtual processor is considered to have the same number of threads and cores as each of the underlying physical processors. You must assign a number of licenses equal to the sum of the greatest number of:

· virtual processors at any one time used by virtual operating system environments in which instances of software are running and

· physical processors at any one time used by physical operating system environments in which instances of software are running.

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3 Comments

  1. I have a question that has been going around in the Virtualization community for a while concerning the difference in how Hyper-V and Vmware presents mulitcore-processors to the guest VMs. Hyper-V presents the multicore capablities to the guest – Vmware presents each CORE as an virtual processor. The SQL Virtualization Whitepaper states "Virtual Processors Have the Same Number of Cores and Threads as Physical Processors—Each Fraction of a Virtual Processor Counts as a Full Virtual Processor". This is not an issue in Hyper-V, since the mulitcore is presented as a single virtual processor. However, in order to get the equivalent processing power in VMware, you would need to present each of the 4 cores in a 4 core processor as a Virtual processor. Although it would LOOK like 4 processors to the guest VM, it would actually be just 1 physical core. My hope would be that Microsoft would still consider this single processor license, but the logic is a bit fuzzy because of the different way that hypervisors present processing cores. Could you clarify this?

  2. Hi ThereMy understanding is that both Vmware and Hyper-V present each core as a virtual processor in the guest VM – but absolutely correct me if I am wrong on thisSo if there are two virtual processors in the VM and the physical processors are 4 core you need 2/4 = 0.5 => 1 license (Each fraction of a Virtual Processor counts as a full Virtual Processor)The language we have in the PUR is not clear enough and we are going to change it. “Virtual Processors Have the Same Number of Cores and Threads as Physical Processor” is intended to convey the point that the way we count Virtual Processors in licensing is different from the way the Virtual Processors are counted or labeled in a virtual machine. So in a scenario where the physical processors are all 4 core the table below shows the distinction between Virtual Processors and “Licensing” Virtual Processors – make more sense?Virtual Processors / Licensing requirements for those Virtual Processors1 1 2 13 14 15 26 27 28 2of course since April 2009 Product Use Rights we now count the above for Standard edition only, all per proc Enterprise versions of the Per proc Server Applications are licensed per physcial procs regardless of the virtual procs!Hope this helpsEmma

  3. Hi Emma,Could you clarify something for me in relation to Standard Edition SQL Server licensed by Processor. If a customer has a 4 processor server which has been virtualised, and SQL Server is only being used by 1 virtual processor and is not installed at the physical level, does the customer still need to count all 4 physical processors + 1 virtual processor to be correctly licensed? So for using 1 virtual proc to run a small system in VM or Hyper-V they will need 5 Procs of Standard Edition?

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